About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 14
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14
, there are conflicting views of beijing's role as banker to the united states government. some see it as a source of leverage, but others see chinese holdings of u.s. debt as an investment with little return. >> it's not invested in their own country. it hasn't been given to their own people. it's a gigantic waste of money. and really, it does not give china leverage over the u.s., because if they used it, they'd only be shooting themselves in the foot. so, in that respect, i think it's as much a symbol of a weak imbalances in the chinese economy as it is of chinese power. >> reporter: and even if the chinese government wanted to sell off u.s. treasuries, it's not clear it could find a buyer. >> the bigger problem is if they announced that they were simply not going to participate in the next treasury auction or the next three or four treasury auctions. that would produce something of a scramble to see who would participate. the result would probably be some increase in interest rates here. >> reporter: but even that seems likely to hurt china as much or more than the united states. china buys u.
or government of libya. >> warner: the president said the united states would work with the libyan government to track down the perpetrators. >> today, we mourn four more americans who represent the very best of the united states of america. we will not waver in our commitment to see that justice is done for this terrible act. and make no mistake, justice will be done. >> warner: for now, the pentagon ordered special units of marines to libya called "fast" teams, like this detachment shown training, to reinforce security at diplomatic sites in libya. and from tripoli, the president of libya's national assembly echoed the words of his american counterparts. >> ( translated ): we apologize to the united states of america and to the american people and to the whole world for what happened, and at the same time we expect the rest of the world to help us face these cowardly criminal acts. we refuse to use our country's land as a scene of cowardly reprisals. >> warner: those reprisals came apparently in response to internet clips of a film titled "the innocence of muslims" that crudely defamed the
's accomplished. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! trade tensions between the united states and china are heating up again. this morning, the two countries challenged each other in the world trade organization. the u.s. is accusing china of illegally subsidizing auto and auto parts exports, and hurting u.s. made goods. and china claims trade laws here, open the door for illegal tariffs on a wide range of chinese products. sylvia hall breaks down what's behind the latest flareup. >> reporter: here in the u.s., the auto and auto parts industries employ about 800,000 american workers. the government says those workers are hurt by the money china gives to subsidize its own auto industry. and in ohio, a key swing state fueled by cars, president obama promised a crack down: >> these are subsidies that directly harm working men and women on the assembly lines in ohio and michigan and across the midwest. it is not right, it is against the rules, and we will not let >> reporter: the administration said that between 2009 and 2011, the chinese government offered up at least $1 billion in subsidies to its au
after new years sending the economy into reverse. >> and it's not a threat just for the united states of america. it's a threat for the global economy given the size of the u.s. economy and it's linkages with many other countries around the globe. >> reporter: if the u.s. slows, there may not be anyone left to pick up the slack. even china looks like its growth is faltering. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> reporter: i'm diane eastabrook in central illinois. still ahead, the harvest is under way, and farmers are figuring out just how much damage the drought did to their crops. >> tom: that free checking account may not be so free. new regulations are squeezing bank profits, sending banks, both big and small, looking for new ways to bring in revenue. one way is by doing away with the free checking account which was so popular in the late 90's. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: dick evans is the c.e.o. of cullen/frost bankers. frost has 115 branches around texas. he says checking account fees are going up because of increased government regulation that went into effect a year ag
than what i think the people of the world expected from the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were
to have more competitors, last year the united states had like 87% of the global market, 60 some odd billion dollars. what you'll see is they will not have as high of a share. i think the u.s. company share will drop back closer to 50%. >> tom: does the market shrink as well? or does that market continue to grow even with more competitors? >> well, the market grew substantially this year, primarily because of the threat that many middle east countries perceive from iran so, that was the big uptick in the global market. but again i think that the competition will be in what we call the developing countries, europe is not increasing its defense budget, our budget is going to, it's already going down and it probably will go down even more, even if we don't get sequestration, you will see further reductions as we try to grap well the deficit. >> tom: what's your best guess on this, i know you're in the a company analyst, but do you think this deal passes regulatory muster internationally? >> i think it will, because we had the same questions back in the 90s when we had, for example, lock
problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say, debt relief to greece, well, then you can be pretty sure that other european countries that also have received bailouts will want the same treatment. so what you're trying to do in europe, in minute, is really to-- i believe that ultimately debt relief will have-- further debt relief will have to be given to greece by the euro area governments. but they're really trying to make the road to that so arduous and so terrible that nobody else in europe will really want to go down that route. and as we're looking at greece today-- which has a cumulative decline in g.d.p. of, you know, close to 20% and still dropping-- i think it's
any of these bs characters isic -- characteristics in the united states. particularly with the u.s. bond market. >> i don't see any there.to thes are valued highly is because people have a lot of fear. they worry about inflation long term. people are snake bitten by the volatility that we have been through. they are looking for places to park cash. >> is there a normally highturns right now? and i'm a fleyed -- afraid that the answer is they are not. >> they tell us gold ask isshow >> tom: the researchers did tell us they think gold is showing some signs characteristic of a price bubble. >> susie: today was clean up day for communities along louisiana's gulf coast, after days of strong winds and heavy rain, residents and businesses began the process of getting things back to normal after hurricane isaac. early estimates on the cost of the storm are running at $2 billion according to calculations by the firm air worldwide. the company says the numbers could go higher because of heavier than expected rain and flooding from that category one hurricane. president obama will tour the
, there is instincts, there's tough calls. >> mr. speaker, the president of the united states. >> woodruff: one of the criticisms of mr. obama's leadership is that he's had so much difficulty winning support from congress. many republicans say that's because he was too beholden to his democratic base. tom davis is a former g.o.p. congressman from virginia. >> when he got elected i think he had every intention of trying to bring everybody together behind him, let's work together, but he had a democratic congress. the minute you go over and sit down with the republicans you'll have pelosi and the democrats fighting saying "we won the election." so the pressure is for him to produce a work product and the republicans weren't going to follow over and say "oh, yeah, let's work together." it's tough situation. when your party controls both houses, those interest groups control the agenda. they don't want to give it away to the other side. >> reporter: but the number two democrat, dick durbin, said the president often took on leaders of his own party. he recounted a late night white house meeting on h
the united states. if you look around the world, the world economy has been hurtings for two years plus, so i think we've got a long way to go, and we ought to be doing things to get the growth rate higher. but the question of would you rather be living in january, 2009, when the economic team incoming, you're about to be in the great depression, you better figure out what you're going to do once the depression has started that was a black hole that we did not go into. >> president gave himself an incomplete. you were in the white house during the financial and the health care debate. and the debate on whether to raise the debt ceiling. you pointed out more needs to be done. >> i would say in the immediate term, we have to put focus on getting the growth rate up, and getting the growth rate going. it should be on private sector growth, and focus on experts and the focus on trying to focus on getting people to stay in their houses and the equivalent tax cut, and then deficit reduction. >> it's debateable what we'll here hear in the next three nights, did the president fail in housing? should m
with the european debt crisis, and even within the united states, with it being an election year. >> reporter: but burberry says it has been talking to other luxury goods makers, so it knows it's not alone in seeing the slowdown. as a result, luxury good stocks like lvmh, tiffany, and coach also fell today, although they didn't get hit nearly as hard as burberry. it's not just luxury firms getting hurt by the global slowdown. many other bellwether firms have said revenues are suffering due to weaker sales in china, europe and elsewhere. in the s&p 500, there have been 88 negative pre-announcements for th and only 20 positive ones. >> the number of negative pre- announcements we've received is the worst in over a decade. we've already seen analysts become very bearish on these companies. >> reporter: last week, chipmaker intel drastically reduced its sales forecast, warning consumers and businesses are buying fewer personal computers. the company also withdrew its full-year guidance, which is seen as a sign of extreme uncertainty. and fedex recently cut its earnings forecast due to slowing dem
for coal. >> you have say unique sper spective. you say coal provides 10% of the electricity in the united states. what's your take on economic demand as we move into the new year? >> well, what we're not seeing is strong industrial and manufacturing demand. not to say that we're not seeing growth in certain areas. i think in terms of economic activity. we're seeing a little growth, but it's not to the point where it needs to be in our view to make a fundamental difference to getting the economy where it ought to be in terms of higher levels of gdp growth. we appreciate the insights. it's greg boyce, the ceo of peabody energy. you can see our entire interview online at nbr.com. also online, how do long-term investors fit into the market in this age of high-frequency trading? visit nbr.com. tomorrow on nbr, home prices aren't the only things going up in housing-- the cost of land also is on the rise. and the latest efforts for parents and students to make better financial decisions when it comes to paying for college. could this hail mary pass force a breakthrough in one of the country's hi
such as in europe. >> tom: i want to ask about demand here in the united states, because natural gas prices have been very low for quite some period of time thanks to new drilling techniques that have led to an abundance of natural gas. how high are natural gas prices have to go in order for your industry, the coal miners, to begin to see a pickup in demand domestically? >> well, when we see gas get back to the $3 range, coal will be back in money in terms of dispatching the electricity market. i think it's public policys that don't allow us to compete and we're starting to see what we believe are bad public policys that are going to carry bad chemical weaponss for american business and american consumers. >> tom: i want to ask you about one of those, an e. p. a. rule that would require plants built after april 2013, power plants, to have carbon capture technology. what kind of impact may that have on coal demand there after? >> well, tom, that is a policy that says we're not going to invest in the future of coal and future of clean coal technology, because if you're going to require something t
, the ability to grab market share. it has continued to see its market share erode down to 10% in the united states now compared to google and apple which have been growing their share. >> well, there is positives in the results and it was nice to see the total subscriber base grow to that 80 million it is important to remember that the company still saw revenue decline by 31% on a year-over-year basis. the number of units that were shipped, that 7.4 million for the entire quarter that compared to the 5 million apple sold and on its first weekend of sales are for thix phone 5. so this is a company that has-losing share, people view the platform as being behind the curve technologically and they still have a lot of ground to cover to catch up. >> does it have any price pog we are when it comes to its new device the blackberry -- in other words, it may not make it up on volume but can it continue to see margins and perhaps even increase margins within the company posted a loss this quarter and the expectations are they are going to post a loss in the next your as well. so they are not driving
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14